NHSRC Brochure page 1

REPUBLIC ACT 9709

 

All infants born in the Philippines should undergo HEARING SCREENING shortly after birth . . . before one month of age.

IF THERE IS DOUBT THAT A CHILD IS HARD AT HEARING, DO NOT DELAY! CONSULT A DOCTOR OR GO TO THE NEAREST HEARING SCREENING CENTER.

 

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WHY DOES BABY NEED TO UNDERGO HEARING SCREENING?

  1. An infant born with hearing impairment does not show obvious symptoms.
  2. Hearing is important so that a child will be able to talk.
  3. A child who grows up deaf will have difficulty in speaking and learning.


HOW DO WE KNOW IF BABY HAS A HEARING PROBLEM?

HOW DO WE KNOW IF BABY HAS A HEARING PROBLEM?


Otoacoustic Emissions (OAE) test or Automated Auditory Brainstem Response (AABR) test may be used as screening tests. These tests are fast to perform (5-10 minutes) and they have no known harmful effects. All are needed are a silent environment and calm quiet infant so that the earplug of the instrument will become fit. It is done is a quiet room or inside the room of the mother and child one day after an infant is born.


WHAT IF THE RESULT OF BABY’S HEARING SCREENING TEST IS REFER?


Additional testing or confirmatory hearing test is needed to find out why the infant failed the OAE or AABR test. This is also done to determine the cause of hearing loss. We recommend following the schedule:

 NHSRC Brochure page 2

WHAT IF THE RESULT OF BABY’S HEARING SCREENING TEST IS REFER?


WHAT IF THE RESULT OF BABY’S HEARING SCREENING TEST IS PASS?

No further confirmatory hearing test is need for the moment. However, it does not mean that the infant is not hard at hearing or may become hard at hearing while he/she is growing-up. The following milestones should be noted while the child is growing-up:

0-3 MONTHS

  • Startled when hearing a loud noise
  • Soothed and quieted when hearing familiar voices or soft sounds

3-6 MONTHS

  • Looks or turns toward sound
  • Begins to repeat sounds or “babbling”
  • Enjoys playing rattles and toys that make sounds
  • Responds to changes in tone of voice

6-12 MONTHS

  • Responds to sounds even when not loud
  • Imitates simple words and sounds
  • Responds to name calling
  • Knows common words or things such as “bye-bye”

12 MONTHS AND ABOVE

  • Can clearly say “mama” and “papa”
  • Plays with own voice, enjoys sounds and feels it
  • Point toward or looks at familiar objects

If there is doubt that a child is hard at hearing then consult a doctor immediately or go to the nearest Hearing Screening Center. A child diagnosed with hearing impairment at an early age might still have a chance to hear, speak, learn and live normally.


References:

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